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Fish around Tamarindo

Please find details below about some of the fish that can be found in the waters around Tamarindo.

Click on an image below to scroll down for more details about each fish. 

fish of Tamarindo roosterfish
fish of Tamarindo Yellow fin Tuna
fish of Tamarindo blue marlin
fish of Tamarindo mahi-mahi
fish of Tamarindo black marlin
fish of Tamarindo snapper
fish of Tamarindo striped marlin
fish of Tamarindo sailfish
fish of Tamarindo roosterfish

Roosterfish

Named after the 7 spines that extrude from its dorsal fin which create a comb similar to that of a Roster’s.

An extremely sought after gamefish, with sizes varying from around 20 lbs to over 100 lbs. Tamarindo offers great fishing opportunities for this catch and release fish, with plenty of rocky outcroppings, submerged structures and the Catalina Islands offering ideal habitats.

fish of Tamarindo blue marlin

Blue Marlin (Makaira Nigricans)

One of the world’s largest “bony” fish. This fish exhibits a real difference between the genders, with males rarely exceeding 330 lbs and females often far surpassing 1,000 lbs.

One of the largest ever taken on rod & reel, “Choy’s Monster”, weighed in at a whopping 1,506 lbs. The average weight of this fish in the Tamarindo waters is around 300 lbs, still a very respectable catch!

fish of Tamarindo black marlin

Black Marlin (Makaira Indica)

Due to their elusive nature these are one of the most sought after Marlin. Rainy season In Guanacaste (between May to November) often brings these fish into shallower water where they are sometimes hooked just 3 miles offshore.

The largest rod and reel catch is thought to have been made by Alfred Glassell, Jr., weighing in at 1,560 lbs. Easily misidentified, the giveaway being Black Marlin have a very short dorsal fin and cannot retract their peck fins.

fish of Tamarindo striped marlin

Striped Marlin (Kajikia Audax)

These smaller but extremely agile marlin show up every year in mild to tropical Indo-Pacific Oceans providing Tamarindo based boats multiple daily hook-ups.

Bill Boniface is credited with taking the largest striped by rod and reel at 494 lbs.

fish of Tamarindo Yellow fin Tuna

Yellowfin Tuna (Thunnus Albacares)

Torpedo shaped and easily distinguishable by its long anal fin and bright yellow sides. A delicacy, which has unfortunately led to global stocks being drastically depleted.

Yellowfin Tuna can be found in costal waters around this region with rainy season (May to November) tending to produce larger catches. One of the largest (unconfirmed) catches ever reported on conventional tackle is 445 lbs.

fish of Tamarindo mahi-mahi

Dorado / Mahi-Mahi / Common Dolphin Fish (Acanthocybium Solandri)

The area sees large numbers of Dorado every year. During rainy season (May to November) is when the bulk of the action can be found when there are large gatherings of floating organic debris. That said these fish can be caught throughout the year.

Mahi- Mahi in the Hawaiian language means very strong which is a accurate description. Although their life span is thought to be no longer than five years they are one of the ocean’s quickest reproducers.

fish of Tamarindo snapper

Red Snapper (Lutjanus campechanus)

It has 10 dorsal spines, three anal spines and 8 to 9 anal soft rays.

This snapper reaches maturity at a length of about 39 cm (15 in). The common adult length being only around 60 cm (24 in),

They stay relatively close to the bottom, and inhabit rocky bottoms, ledges, ridges, and artificial reefs, Smaller than the bigger inhabitants of the area, but worth hooking as they are super tasty.

fish of Tamarindo sailfish

Sailfish (Istiophorus Platypterus)

With double-digit opportunities daily, there are plenty of opportunities to catch one of these magnificent fish.

Considered as the fastest fish in the ocean, Pacific Sailfish have been clocked at over 68 mph! The largest ever taken on conventional tackle is thought to be Carl Stewart’s at 221 lbs.

Fantastic fishing awaits you in Tamarindo! Why not drop us a line on our contact page with any questions you may have, we’d love to hear from you. 

Tap on an image below to scroll down for more details about each fish. 

fish of Tamarindo roosterfish
fish of Tamarindo black marlin
fish of Tamarindo Yellow fin Tuna
fish of Tamarindo snapper
fish of Tamarindo blue marlin
fish of Tamarindo striped marlin
fish of Tamarindo mahi-mahi
fish of Tamarindo sailfish
fish of Tamarindo roosterfish

Roosterfish

Named after the 7 spines that extrude from its dorsal fin which create a comb similar to that of a Roster’s.

An extremely sought after gamefish, with sizes varying from around 20 lbs to over 100 lbs. Tamarindo offers great fisheries for this catch and release fish, with plenty of rocky outcroppings, submerged structures and the Catalina Islands offering ideal habitats.

fish of Tamarindo blue marlin

Blue Marlin (Makaira Nigricans)

One of the world’s largest “bony” fish. This fish exhibits a real difference between the genders, with males rarely exceeding 330 lbs and females often far surpassing 1,000 lbs.

One of the largest ever taken on rod & reel, “Choy’s Monster”, weighed in at a whopping 1,506 lbs. The average weight of this fish in the Tamarindo and Flamingo waters is around 300 lbs, a still very respectable catch!

fish of Tamarindo black marlin

Black Marlin (Makaira Indica)

Due to their elusive nature these are one of the most sought after Marlin. Rainy season In Guanacaste often brings these fish into shallower water where they are sometimes hooked just 3 miles offshore.

The largest rod and reel catch is thought to have been made by Alfred Glassell, Jr., weighing in at 1,560 lbs. Easily misidentified, the giveaway being Black Marlin have a very short dorsal fin and cannot retract their peck fins.

fish of Tamarindo striped marlin

Striped Marlin (Kajikia Audax)

These smaller but extremely agile marlin show up every year in mild to tropical Indo-Pacific Oceans providing Tamarindo based boats multiple daily hook-ups.

Bill Boniface is credited with taking the largest striped by rod and reel at 494 lbs.

fish of Tamarindo Yellow fin Tuna

Yellowfin Tuna (Thunnus Albacares)

Torpedo shaped and easily distinguishable by its long anal fin and bright yellow sides. Delicious, which has unfortunately led to global stocks being drastically depleted.

Yellowfin Tuna can be found in costal waters around this region with rainy season tending to produce larger catches. One of the largest (unconfirmed) catches ever reported on conventional tackle is 445 lbs.

fish of Tamarindo mahi-mahi

Dorado / Mahi-Mahi / Common Dolphin Fish (Acanthocybium Solandri)

The area sees large numbers of large Dorado every year. During rainy season is when The bulk of the action can be found when there are large gatherings of floating organic debris. That said these fish can be caught throughout the season.

Mahi- Mahi in the Hawaiian language means very strong which is a very accurate description. Although their life span is thought to be no longer than five years they are thought to be one of the ocean’s quickest reproducers.

fish of Tamarindo snapper

Red Snapper (Lutjanus campechanus)

It has 10 dorsal spines, three anal spines and eight to 9 anal soft rays.

This snapper reaches maturity at a length of about 39 cm (15 in). The common adult length being only around 60 cm (24 in),

They stay relatively close to the bottom, and inhabit rocky bottoms, ledges, ridges, and artificial reefs, Smaller than the bigger inhabitants of the area, but worth hooking as they are super tasty.

fish of Tamarindo sailfish

Sailfish (Istiophorus Platypterus)

With double-digit opportunities daily, there are plenty of opportunities to catch one of these magnificent fish.

Considered as the fastest fish in the ocean, Pacific Sailfish have been clocked at over 68 mph! The largest ever taken on conventional tackle is thought to be Carl Stewart’s at 221 lbs.

Fantastic fishing awaits you in Tamarindo! Why not drop us a line on our contact page with any questions you may have, we’d love to hear from you. 

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Bright Light Media
© 2019 Bright Light Media
All Rights Reserved